Soda and Cancer?

Soda and Cancer?!

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The American Cancer Society recently called on the US Surgeon General to conduct a comprehensive review on the effects sugary drinks have on obesity. Dick Woodruff, vice president of federal affairs for the ACS’s advocacy arm said:

“There is an obesity epidemic … and one in three cancer deaths are due to nutrition and physical activities, including overweight and obesity.” Read more…

The advocacy arm of the American Cancer Society wants “an unbiased and comprehensive report” on all sugary drinks to ultimately shift the American public’s behavior, similar to the shift in smoking after the 1964 landmark report on the effects of smoking.

It is an interesting time for the beverage industry considering the possible NYC ban on large soft drinks that Mayor Bloomberg has proposed. It is our stance that sugary drinks are a major contributor to health problems in this country. Any study that can counter the studies paid for by the beverage industry will surely strengthen this argument.

Will 2012 be the turning point for the soft drink industry? Do you think there will be a shift in consumer behavior? Will soft drinks become the next cigarettes?

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  • http://twitter.com/FeedMeImCranky1 Annabel Adams

    I don’t think soda should be anyone’s beverage of choice, but I’m not thrilled with the idea of banning it or taxing it because I think that makes consumers accustomed to relying on the government to tell them what is and is not healthful, which is incredibly dangerous and has already proven deleterious (just think about why everyone thinks they “need” milk for calcium or meat for protein). I also think framing soda as a contributor to the “obesity epidemic” does us all a disservice. We should be framing our public health dialogues with “health” and seek healthful outcomes. When we frame anything with obesity, we have to – by obesity’s very definition – seek weight-related outcomes.

  • DarkStar

    My nutrition instructor used to always say that in general that very few foods are “bad” for you, its simply a matter of amount you consume. Her motor was “variety and moderation” and she was completely right, if we promoted that more than demonizing specific food items we would be far better offf.