High Fat Food – Straight to Your Bloodstream

We know that greasy burgers and fries are no health food. But in this 2 minute ABC news clip from food coach Lori Corbin, you can actually see how all that saturated fat affects the bloodstream. In realtime.

The fat globules clog the blood vessels, making it harder for the heart to pump blood. But the buildup also has cognitive side effects- look for the rats swimming through a maze towards the end of the video.

Reminder: not all fats are created equally. Fat is an essential part of our diet. You just need to choose the healthy type that is commonly founds in nuts and seeds, avocados, and fish.

Buttery Blood

from ABC7

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  • Millie Barnes

    First of all; French fries are not fried in saturated fats anymore in fast food restaurants.  If they were it they would be far healthier!  They are generally fried in soy or a mix of soy and other vegetable oils.  Those fats are toxic, and then even worse for you when heated.  50% of each days calories should be from fat, 75% of that should be saturated and from organic grass fed animals. Disregard all of the info in the news cast…it based on flawed info.  

  • Brian

    Do we really know that fries and burgers are bad for us? I mean really know. Or are we just listening to misinformed reporters? Seriously. Find a real randomized controlled study that shows this, and absolutely proves it. I will concede that the typical set of omega-6 drenched fries, and cafo beef, is not that healthy for you. But if they were fried with animal fat from pastured animals, I would consider it amazingly healthy. See what one surgeon says about all the baloney: http://www.sott.net/articles/show/242516-Heart-Surgeon-Speaks-Out-On-What-Really-Causes-Heart-Disease

  • Brian

    Do we really know that fries and burgers are bad for us? I mean really know. Or are we just listening to misinformed reporters? Seriously. Find a real randomized controlled study that shows this, and absolutely proves it. I will concede that the typical set of omega-6 drenched fries, and cafo beef, is not that healthy for you. But if they were fried with animal fat from pastured animals, I would consider it amazingly healthy. See what one surgeon says about all the baloney: http://www.sott.net/articles/show/242516-Heart-Surgeon-Speaks-Out-On-What-Really-Causes-Heart-Disease

  • Mitzi

    My grandfather and great-grandfather pasture-raised their animals. they drank whole milk straight from their own cattle. the chickens were free-range by today’s standards. Grandfather died at the age of 62 of a massive heart attack. His father died young of the same thing. Most of the men and a few of the women of their generation, eating an almost perfect paleo-style hight-fat diet, died young. Saturated fat from grass-fed animals WILL KILL YOU. The science is clear. The South was a Stroke belt when we cooked with pasture-raised lard, and is now that we fry everything with veg oil. A friend from India tells me that her region cooks almost entirely with coconut oil- and is known as the stroke belt of India. When you eat far too much of it, any fat will clog your arteries.
    My father learned that he could not donate platelets for leukemia patients after a fast food meal, because he could see the visible yellow blobs of fat clogging the machine. Yes, we do KNOW that fries and burgers are bad for us. 

    • Brian

      What else did your grandparents eat? A lot of high GI foods? Were they stressed? Is it absolutely the animal foods? What about the Messai tribes in Africa and the Inuit. Their diets were very high in fats and meats, but they had very low rates of cardiac disease. 

      By perfect paleo, do you mean absolutely no grains, dairy or sugar? And a lot of greens and vegetables… more veggies then meat? 
      In the south, were they making biscuits and gravy? Or just gravy? Same thing for India? Are they deficient in anything that may lead to cardiovascular disease? Coconut oil + processed food still = bad.

      Aside from a few people that cure MS and a few other disorders with high fat diets, there aren’t a lot of people that can make a high fat diet work. But that doesn’t mean you should completely avoid fats, as the government likes to suggest.Fast food meals usually mean there is a highly processed bun, and a large glass of sugar water included, but few actually talk about that aspect of the meal. Which has a worse effect on the health? Besides that point, I think everyone here agrees that most fast food is not a healthy source of food.

    • Brian

      What else did your grandparents eat? A lot of high GI foods? Were they stressed? Is it absolutely the animal foods? What about the Messai tribes in Africa and the Inuit. Their diets were very high in fats and meats, but they had very low rates of cardiac disease. 

      By perfect paleo, do you mean absolutely no grains, dairy or sugar? And a lot of greens and vegetables… more veggies then meat? 
      In the south, were they making biscuits and gravy? Or just gravy? Same thing for India? Are they deficient in anything that may lead to cardiovascular disease? Coconut oil + processed food still = bad.

      Aside from a few people that cure MS and a few other disorders with high fat diets, there aren’t a lot of people that can make a high fat diet work. But that doesn’t mean you should completely avoid fats, as the government likes to suggest.Fast food meals usually mean there is a highly processed bun, and a large glass of sugar water included, but few actually talk about that aspect of the meal. Which has a worse effect on the health? Besides that point, I think everyone here agrees that most fast food is not a healthy source of food.

    • Pegheinemancihocki

       Sounds like there was a genetic component to your grandfather and his father’s early death from a heart attack, so I don’t think you can blame their diet alone.  Also, Brian has some good points–stuff they ate along with their grass fed meat and lard most assuredly had an effect, too.  And as for India, I’m not sure what region your friend is referring to, but I grew up in South India, where the diet is largely vegetarian.  As a child, I don’t remember a lot of heart disease, but there were plenty of infectious diseases to kill them off before they had a chance to develop heart disease.  In those days, the primary cooking oils were peanut oil and ghee, but we did eat a lot of coconut and probably cooked with it, too.  Those who didn’t succumb to infectious diseases generally survived to ripe old age and did not die of heart attack or stroke.  Now that the same region has switched to vegetable oils (and still eat a high carbohydrate diet of rice and lentils) heart disease and T2 diabetes rates are rising precipitously.  Yet, as ghee, peanut and coconut oil have largely been replaced by vegetable oil, their consumption of saturated fats has gone down, not up.  Hmmm. See my comment above.  There are no randomized controlled trials that show saturated fat clogs the arteries or causes heart disease. There are many that show that it prevents heart disease.

    • Lisa

      “My father learned that he could not donate platelets for leukemia patients after a fast food meal,”

      Duh. Leukemia patients are the last people in the world who need to come into contact with anything that had to do with a fast food meal. The quality of fat and food counts, and everyone knows that, done properly, a burger and fries made at home is not the same as one from your local greasy spoon.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ONCV5UMSOEQEJ3VRPBR2HAQXN4 Charles

    And just where does the sugar go? Does it not go into the bloodstream, too?

  • Pegheinemancihocki

    This is so misleading.  How does the doctor know that the fat in the blood/test tubes came from the fats in the meal? He doesn’t.  Without drawing blood from the same guy after a low carb, low PUFA meal, there is no way to know. At least some of the carbohydrates in the meal are also converted to triglycerides–some of which are saturated.  Here’s another take:  http://rdfeinman.wordpress.com/2012/02/22/saturated-fat-on-your-plate-or-in-your-blood/ When fats are consumed with a high carb meal, yes, they enter the blood stream because the body has to dispose of all the glucose from the carbs first before it can do anything about the fats.  Because too much glucose in the blood is toxic.  When saturated fats are consumed with a low carb meal, they do enter the blood, but are quickly used for energy and don’t have time to “clog the arteries.” There is absolutely no proof that saturated fats from food cause heart disease, just some weak correlations.  On the other hand, there are at least 101 scientific papers published in peer reviewed journals that show that cholesterol and saturated fat prevent heart disease.  Before you fall for this, read “Cholesterol and Saturated Fat Prevent Heart Disease: The evidence from 101 scientific papers.” by David Evans. Or “Fat and Cholesterol are Good For You” by Uffe Ravnskov, M.D., PhD.

  • Dion Kerfont

    Whoever made this video realizes that fat is liquid at body temperature, correct?  It’s liquid at even lower temperatures.  It’s amazing to me how the medical profession continuously pushes this myth as fact.

  • Jim

    There doesn’t seem to be any actual science here. Where is the refereed paper, where is the data and who are the authors? It looks like an empty scare to me. And that rat study seems preposterous. Lets see the papers!

  • Mitzi

    My ancestors has mixed vegetable, fruit, and meat farming. The only grains that grew well in their region were barley (low GI for a grain) and corn, mostly eaten as fresh sweet corn in the summer (not the modern varieties-much less sugar then). They ate mostly what they grew or raised because they had little money. Granny was not a good baker. Papa threw one of her birthday cake attempts to the hogs. They ate pretty close to Paleo. My friend from India is from a coastal region on the other side of the Western Ghats from the rest of the continent. Neither of these population groups had/has much access to junk food. Both eat or ate lots of homegrown produce. No overt deficiencies, except for intermittent iodine issues in my ancestors doing inland farming. Both groups die young of heart attacks and strokes. Except for some of the women, who ate mostly vegetables and were quite long-lived.
    The information in this write-up is true. It is not misleading. Draw the blood of anyone on a high fat diet and you will see the blobs of fat that will eventually clog their arteries and kill them.  I’m a cell biologist, not a follower of a diet book writer and a dentist (the Masai and Eskimo examples, high infant mortality and early death in extreme climates but nice teeth, get rather old), and you want a low, balanced level of fats in your diet, not endless pasture-fed butter. The excess sat fats stiffen your cell membranes, making the cells less able to adapt to changing conditions. I just saw a circadian rhythm presentation last week indicating that high salt, high fat, or high protein diets can mess with your internal clocks. Balance, y’all, balance.
    My father has seen his own blood do what is shown above. You can, too, if you eat like the repeat-the-same-thing-over-and-over posters with their Weston Price talking points. Just have a blood draw, or attempt it, after a meal of 50% fat. See for yourself. Wonderful. Look up the actual research on Pubmed from the national library of medicine instead of trusting any guru. The research is clear. A diet that avoids junk and focuses on plants is best. A little meat is OK if you do not have CVD. Maybe. I have done colon cancer research. Made me a vegetarian except for fish. A consistent record of decades of work showing the same things tends to do that. Too much fat/sugar/junk will kill you. If you wouldn’t put it in the pipes of your home (we are advised not to put fats down the sewers around here), don’t put it in your personal pipes, either. Fats in excess clog the pipes. Period.

    • Lisa

      What constitutes a high fat diet? Some people believe that anything over 10% in the diet is too much; others say over 40% is pushing it. This is daily, not per meal.

      60g a day of fat — so, around 35% of your intake — from Micky D’s and chips — is not the same as 60 g from avocados or nuts. The problem with articles like these is that they never differentiate between fat sources or offer specific guidelines. The best the food guides can come up with is to “avoid” (as in, try to avoid the oncoming car, but it’s okay if you get hit every now and then!) trans fats. Not impressive.

    • Dion Kerfont

      Using bad science to back up more bad science doesn’t make the bad science better… just so you know.  Saturated fat does not go straight to your bloodstream; but carbohydrates will raise both your blood sugar and triglycerides very quickly.  If you notice in that video, there was a huge amount of carbohydrates consumed.  If you really wanted to examine what a high fat meal does to your blood, you should not include carbohydrates in that meal.

      Dr. Eades talks about what is really going on in this video… and it certainly isn’t what you’ve been led to believe:

      http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/saturated-fat/abcs-big-meal-propaganda/

  • Lisa

    ” nuts and seeds, avocados, and fish.”

    Foods that can contain high levels of saturated fats. Fish will probably have the lowest amount of sat fat of the three, but this doesn’t exactly jibe with your argument against saturated fats. Are you agreeing with the video or not? What you’re posting here and what that video says is not the same.

  • Sean Johnson

    All of the flaws that needed to be pointed out in this ABC clip have been pointed out by previous commenters.  I only want to add my disappointment that Fooducate is promoting this thinking amid such strong evidence to the contrary nutritional thinking.  An overwhelming amount of recent and past research points to the carbohydrate being the culprit for the fatty acid increase.  Additionally, along with the poster 
    Pegheinemancihocki, 
    I’d like to commend to you Dr. Feinman’s blog. http://rdfeinman.wordpress.com/2012/02/22/saturated-fat-on-your-plate-or-in-your-blood/
    And Dr. Attia’s blog (He maintains a diet of 95% fat –mostly saturated) and yet has lowered his risk of heart disease and maintains a 7.5% body fat.  http://waroninsulin.com/nutrition/what-i-actually-eat

  • Darryl Miglio

    Is ABC News having a slow news day?  Does anyone really believe this “example” has any relavance to what happens in the bloodstream?  That fat goes straight to the blood stream?  Sensationalism at its worst.

  • Cartoonguy_99

    Just like every other mainstream report on the ill effects of diet, this is another crock of hooey.
    Yes, eating a 2500 calorie lunch (no matter what the macro make-up) isn’t going to be good for you if you consistently go over your calorie needs day by day and become obese.
    And as far as rat studies, they’re only mentioned when they support the hypothesis. If they don’t support, then they are disqualified as ‘only rat studies’.
    But hey, what ever gets you on the news for 5 minutes right?

  • Suzielouwho

    The misinformation and perpetuation thereof by is does not cease to amaze me.  It’s why consumers do not know who to trust – so they trust no one – or quacks.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Laurie-Rivera/617138268 Laurie Rivera

    What I think is a riot is that this was a high CARB meal more than anything else. And we all know what carbs do to us. High saturated fat diet sourced from animals raised eating their natural diets is the best thing for us. Even vegan guru Gabriel Cousens recommends up to 50% calories from fat, lots of it saturated. He’s curing diabetes with that. ;-)

  • Paul Kayley

    I love it when people who don’t have a clue start preaching to the masses! This is pure but well intended misinformation. The reality appears to be much more complex than this. The body is a complex and reactive biochemical system, its not a simplistic plumbing system which gets blocked by hardened fats! Over-consumption of calories which the body struggles to process is more of an issue, causing eicosanoid imbalances which lead to the vasoconstrictions described by the smug suit in the film. The stability of the fats in the blood is far more important than the amount of fats, and the more saturated a fat is, the more stable and resistant to damage it becomes. Which is why saturated fat is the best, mono-unsaturated fats are OK, and poly-unsaturated fats are problematic.